Archive for the ‘Twitter’ Category

russian_art_song

I got wind of the Russian Art Song website via the Diction Police Facebook Page and the Your Accompanist Twitter feed (thanks, you two!).  The site is by Dr. Anton Belov, a baritone who hails from Russia.  Resources include (from the description on the home page):

  • IPA transcriptions and word for word translations
  • Song lyrics read by a native speaker
  • Multimedia online diction manuals
  • Vintage common domain sound recordings (how to access audio files)
  • Scores (for reference only)
  • Biographical information

Also check their About page for links to other websites related to Russian opera and song.

One especially outstanding resource on the site is A Guide to Russian Diction, a 67-page book available as a free PDF download.

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ThinkMusic Technology’s video about its upcoming music notation app created quite a splash, but now it’s getting some backblow due to assertions on the Sibelius Blog that the video is not a demo of a working app, but rather a simulation created using Sibelius and GoodReader. Related posts on the Sibelius Blog:

Makers of music handwriting app video used Sibelius and GoodReader to create dramatization
A new tablet app that recognizes handwritten music?

As usual, Chris Russell also has some good insights about the situation: Some thoughts regarding that “new” notation app by Think Music…

Frankly, I’m a bit disappointed. ThinkMusic Technology should have given full disclosure in the video that it was a simulation (kind of like those TV ads for phones and tablets that say “simulated display”) – and then asked for our support for their Kickstarter project (if there actually is one). By posting their video without any disclaimers or commentary, they succeeded at getting my attention initially, but now their credibility with me has eroded a bit. My day job experience here in Silicon Valley has taught me that it’s one thing for a tech start-up to come up with a good concept, but actually delivering on that concept is an entirely different matter. In fact I should probably know better than to take such a video at face value – anyone can put together a sexy “concept” video. In addition, it’s a bit sketchy that a company would use a competitor’s product to create marketing material for their own product that doesn’t exist yet.

Nonetheless, gauging from the response, ThinkMusic Technology hit the nail on the head when it comes to the concept itself – we are all drooling for an app that does what’s shown in the video. For my part, I’ll keep tabs on what they’re doing, though perhaps a bit more warily… There’s a good chance that I would support a Kickstarter project too, but first I would do some due diligence on who runs the company, their background and bona fides, and their track record in these sorts of ventures. (Side note: This made me curious about whether Kickstarter has safeguards to prevent project creators from simply absconding with the money, and the answer is, um, not really…so do your homework, people!)

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[UPDATED 1/8/13: This may have been a “concept” video, rather than an actual product demo.  See my follow-up post, Dear ThinkMusic Technology: Nice “concept” video, but can you deliver?]

ThinkMusic Technology will soon release a music notation iPad app that purportedly has handwriting recognition for music notation (and text too, e.g. chord symbols). The announcement has generated a lot of buzz on Twitter.

Chris Russell at Technology for Music Education has already posted a great breakdown of the app preview video on YouTube, plus info from Twitter on what’s known so far about the app. Read his post here: ThinkMusicGroup (thinkmusictechnology.com) Notation App Coming Soon

In the meantime, you can watch the app preview video, sign up for email updates on the ThinkMusic Technology website, or follow them on Twitter or Facebook.

Just a quick post to share this tweet from @Lorskyfink.  (You can view a larger image of the iPad mini with sheet music here.) [UPDATE 11/9/2012: @Lorskyfink made the further comment: “Well, to be fair, some feel the regular iPad isn’t big enough for sheet music. You have to have the eyes for it. :-)” I replied that the photo reminds me of one of those paperback-book-sized study scores, which not everyone may find big enough for performance use.] [UPDATE 12/19/2012: This post has another photo from @Lorskyfink that shows a regular iPad and an iPad Mini side-by-side displaying the same sheet music.]

In case anyone was wondering, the iPad is actually big enough and clear enough for sheet music.

Credit: @Lorskyfink on Twitter

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Earlier this week, @Lorskyfink kicked off a brainstorming session on guidelines and tips for iPad use in choir rehearsal.  Here’s how it went down.  What are your thoughts on how best to use iPads in choir?

Michelle Latour is soliciting input from voice teachers and students for an article for Classical Singer.  She wants to know how teachers use social media and the implications in their voice studio:

For voice teachers, how do you handle social media? Are you friends with your students on Facebook? Why/why not? […] How do you predominantly communicate with your students- text, phone or email? If you do text, do you have any parameters regarding texting?

For those of you currently studying voice, are you friends with your teachers on Facebook? Why/why not? Do you text your teachers? Do you even use email anymore? What are your thoughts about social media and your teachers?

To respond, you can leave a comment at the original blog post or email her directly.

Read the original post at the Auditions Plus blog.